Film. Cinema. Movies. Etc.

Emma Watson. Sofia Coppola. Pretty sure anyone else handling this subject matter would turn it into Gossip Girl. Can’t wait to see this.

The Bling Ring Teaser Trailer - Emma Watson, Leslie Mann (by clevverTV)

housingworksbookstore:

Fahrenheit 451 book design that can be set on fire - Imgur
This book is a good design but also we don’t condone burning books obvs.

Very cool!!

housingworksbookstore:

Fahrenheit 451 book design that can be set on fire - Imgur

This book is a good design but also we don’t condone burning books obvs.

Very cool!!


Lieutenant Dan, ice cream.

I love this blog - as you can see, it has the best GIFs haha

Lieutenant Dan, ice cream.

I love this blog - as you can see, it has the best GIFs haha

Oh em gee. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.
Found on PostSecret this morning.
And oh, goodness, here is what’s at the end of the page this week:
——-Email Message——-

Dear Frank,

A year ago, you posted my secret right before Valentine’s Day. It said “I wish you still loved me the way you did when we drove down this road in Montauk.”

When I saw my secret that Sunday, I was both surprised and heartbroken. At the time it was posted we weren’t speaking. But he saw it, and he knew it was mine.

Now, a year later, we are back together. I just wanted to thank you for letting me share my secret and allowing me to connect with not just him, but everyone who related to my postcard.

Oh em gee. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.

Found on PostSecret this morning.

And oh, goodness, here is what’s at the end of the page this week:

——-Email Message——-
Dear Frank,
A year ago, you posted my secret right before Valentine’s Day. It said “I wish you still loved me the way you did when we drove down this road in Montauk.”
When I saw my secret that Sunday, I was both surprised and heartbroken. At the time it was posted we weren’t speaking. But he saw it, and he knew it was mine.
Now, a year later, we are back together. I just wanted to thank you for letting me share my secret and allowing me to connect with not just him, but everyone who related to my postcard.

I can totally get on-board with this. 

F YES MELISSA MCCARTHY

Couldn’t get this scene out of my head the first time I went to a New York subway.

Couldn’t get this scene out of my head the first time I went to a New York subway.

OOOOOH!

I can now start contributing film and TV articles to UK online magazine WhatCulture! My reaction after editing my snarky author bio and realizing more people will read my writing outside of this humble Tumblr (my humblr)

Salon writer Andrew Leonard (in the article link above) describes how “House of Cards” is symptomatic of a fundamental shift in entertaining the masses. He talks in length about the Netflix data team’s ability to track, record, and interpret its users’ viewing habits and can thereby tailor a personalized movie marketing campaign for each and every subscriber. “House of Cards” relied primarily on this analysis to increase its viewership.

The rub? It could negatively influence the creative process of filmmakers.

Having been staff for the Obama campaign this past election cycle I’m privy to the notion of collecting and analyzing micro-data. He mentions that in the article - the campaign ran the most advanced data initiatives in modern political history, and it is how we will run campaigns from this point forward. Leonard echoes something that I learned while working: data can tell us more about us than we know about ourselves. It’s a mildly creepy thought, I’ll give him that. But considering the way in which we, literally, live online, it’s not so surprising that digital analysts can make assumptions about my habits and lifestyle.

Are they always correct? No, of course not! But the future of marketing in general is this online, psychological response to what we choose to reveal in cyberspace.

I understand the concern of creatives being compromised that Leonard explains in this piece. Netflix knows what scenes in which films of certain genres people watch over and over - for me, if it were available via Netflix, it’s the “hit me” scene in The Dark Knight - and will market certain films and movies towards that preference. It’s smart. Yet, I don’t feel this threatens the creative process at all. At least not now, or for a long time. So long as we showcase and celebrate the innovation of filmmakers, actors and writers who can constantly show us something new (like Christopher Nolan) in the real world - by that, I mean out in the real world at a real, live movie theater with other, real people - then I see no threat of puppetism in mass audience.

And hasn’t my Netflix membership opened more doors to my cinematic repertoire? Yes, of course, by making more characters, more stories, more stunning visual effects available to me. My expanded library lends itself nicely to, say, this blog, or my application to graduate film school.

Let’s not forget that there are a faction of moviegoers who sincerely enjoy the excitement of new films and innovation. Like yours truly.

FIRST THOUGHTS
So I’m a quarter of the way through the first season of Netflix’s original series, “House of Cards,” which stars Kevin Spacey as Frank Underwood, a South Carolina congressman and majority whip. He is the typically dark-sided figure of modern American politics, manipulating stories and truth, and, primarily, scheming with a young reporter, Zoe Barnes, (Kate Mara) to help do his dirty work. 
Basically, it’s The West Wing's younger, more rebellious, congressional sibling. 
David Fincher directs the first two episodes, which sets the quietly sinister tone for the rest of the season. Spot-on choice, too, because it’s loaded with Fincher goodness: sure and steady cinematography, that blueish-greenish low-key lighting, and unwavering control of cast direction. These features certainly illuminate the mood of Frank’s world (which is not unlike another of Spacey’s films, Margin Call) - and to guide us even more is his occasional breaking of the fourth wall to narrate the story. If a character is lying to him or if he’s lying himself, he’ll take an aside to address us with the truth, or an eye-roll. It’s got Fight Club written all over it, which I can certainly appreciate; but it was much more pitch-perfect in that film than this series. It interrupts the flow of the scene at times and borders on cheesy. That’s not to say I don’t appreciate this particular creative choice: it simultaneously draws you in to Frank’s cynicism and emphasizes what sort of relationship he’s built with the other character(s) in play. Would love to see it heighten the tension a little more though.
Spacey, or the writers, can push Frank’s character a little too hard at times, IMO. He speaks an awful lot in vague metaphors of power and dominance to replace straightforward answers, and he lets his eyes linger just a little too long when he’s making a serious point. I mean, it’s Spacey, so on a certain level I respect it, but it misses the mark by a hair in an effort to emphasize the diabolical nature of Frank. One second longer and it’s laughable.
Where these traits do work well, though, are in his interactions with Zoe. At this point, I’m most intrigued by her character than anyone else. A highly driven and stop-at-nothing reporter for The Washington Herald, she manages to move up the ranks quickly while implicitly making some enemies in the process. She forms a Deepthroat type of relationship with Frank, and the creepy vibes he gives off around her are working pretty well at this point. Obviously, their relationship is headed for scandal of some kind, and I’m anxious to see how; I’m only on episode four and Zoe’s covered a lot of ground already.
Other things of note: Frank’s trip to his district in SC is the best episode because it solidifies our suspicions of his political depth; Wright is looking pretty dry at this point and could use a better hairstyle; PA congressman Peter (Corey Stoll) is in the most obviously disjointed and, frankly, boring relationship of the show with one of his staffers; I’m diggin’ the format of the show’s presentation. All episodes loaded at once? Netflix, you’re playin’ my game now.

FIRST THOUGHTS

So I’m a quarter of the way through the first season of Netflix’s original series, “House of Cards,” which stars Kevin Spacey as Frank Underwood, a South Carolina congressman and majority whip. He is the typically dark-sided figure of modern American politics, manipulating stories and truth, and, primarily, scheming with a young reporter, Zoe Barnes, (Kate Mara) to help do his dirty work. 

Basically, it’s The West Wing's younger, more rebellious, congressional sibling. 

David Fincher directs the first two episodes, which sets the quietly sinister tone for the rest of the season. Spot-on choice, too, because it’s loaded with Fincher goodness: sure and steady cinematography, that blueish-greenish low-key lighting, and unwavering control of cast direction. These features certainly illuminate the mood of Frank’s world (which is not unlike another of Spacey’s films, Margin Call) - and to guide us even more is his occasional breaking of the fourth wall to narrate the story. If a character is lying to him or if he’s lying himself, he’ll take an aside to address us with the truth, or an eye-roll. It’s got Fight Club written all over it, which I can certainly appreciate; but it was much more pitch-perfect in that film than this series. It interrupts the flow of the scene at times and borders on cheesy. That’s not to say I don’t appreciate this particular creative choice: it simultaneously draws you in to Frank’s cynicism and emphasizes what sort of relationship he’s built with the other character(s) in play. Would love to see it heighten the tension a little more though.

Spacey, or the writers, can push Frank’s character a little too hard at times, IMO. He speaks an awful lot in vague metaphors of power and dominance to replace straightforward answers, and he lets his eyes linger just a little too long when he’s making a serious point. I mean, it’s Spacey, so on a certain level I respect it, but it misses the mark by a hair in an effort to emphasize the diabolical nature of Frank. One second longer and it’s laughable.

Where these traits do work well, though, are in his interactions with Zoe. At this point, I’m most intrigued by her character than anyone else. A highly driven and stop-at-nothing reporter for The Washington Herald, she manages to move up the ranks quickly while implicitly making some enemies in the process. She forms a Deepthroat type of relationship with Frank, and the creepy vibes he gives off around her are working pretty well at this point. Obviously, their relationship is headed for scandal of some kind, and I’m anxious to see how; I’m only on episode four and Zoe’s covered a lot of ground already.

Other things of note: Frank’s trip to his district in SC is the best episode because it solidifies our suspicions of his political depth; Wright is looking pretty dry at this point and could use a better hairstyle; PA congressman Peter (Corey Stoll) is in the most obviously disjointed and, frankly, boring relationship of the show with one of his staffers; I’m diggin’ the format of the show’s presentation. All episodes loaded at once? Netflix, you’re playin’ my game now.